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Welcome to my math blog! The purpose of this blog is to help you stay informed about our learning and experiences that have taken place during our math class. I have also included links your child (and you) may want to use in order to supplement math learning in 5th grade.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Converting Mixed and Improper Fractions; Rotation Day B

Bell Ringer:  101 Questions

Screenshot 2016-09-20 at 6.16.21 PM.png

Lesson Frame:

  • We will rotate through stations practicing converting mixed and improper fractions.
  • I will describe a situation when it is necessary for me to change a mixed number into an improper fraction and an improper fraction to a mixed number.
Lesson:

Group 1 & 4 spent their 30 minutes of rotations on Khan Academy working on "Rewrite mixed numbers and improper fractions".

I combined my Group 2 & 3 to have them work with me at my table playing BUMP (see yesterday's post) and then the Khan exercise.

I created a Number Sense group to prepare for our UIL Number Sense competition in December. Today they completed a Number Sense test and then played BUMP with me.

Close
  • Describe a situation when it is necessary for me to change a mixed number into an improper fraction and an improper fraction to a mixed number.
Assignment

Fifth Grade Builder #11

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Converting Mixed and Improper Fractions: Rotation Day A

Bell Ringer:  Would You Rather

Screenshot 2017-09-18 at 5.51.45 PM.png

Lesson Frame:
  • We will rotate through stations practicing converting mixed and improper fractions.
  • I will describe what a mixed number and an improper fraction are.
Lesson:

Mixed Numbers and Improper Fractions Games: 12 Fractions Bump Games  Fraction Cootie Catchers


Group 1
Group 2
  • Think Through Math
  • Cootie Catchers: Converting Mixed and Improper Fractions
Group 4
  • Teacher group: BUMP with Converting Mixed and Improper Fractions
  • Think Through Math
Close

Describe what a mixed number and an
improper fraction are.

Assignment:



Monday, September 18, 2017

Converting Mixed and Improper Fractions

Bell Ringer:  Set Game


Lesson Frame:

  • We will take notes on converting mixed and improper fractions.
  • I will explain how I will remember the steps to converting mixed to improper.
Lesson:


We began by reviewing converting mixed numbers into improper fractions.  Using this image, I told students that mixed numbers did not like becoming improper fractions, in fact it made the MAD!  We added this visual to our math journal.  I printed it in color.  I felt the colors helped to emphasize the steps. We used this to practice the steps to converting (multiply, add, denominator).  I like reinforcing the order of operations using this technique as well!


This second visual, I found on Teachers Pay Teachers and purchased.  Again, I printed this in color to help emphasize the steps to converting improper fractions to mixed numbers.  The bottom portion is especially helpful, most of my student do not have difficulty remembering to divide, but remembering which part of the division problem is which part of the mixed number.  We added this visual to our math journals and then spent some time in practice.

Close

Hoping that my students would have found the MAD acronym useful, I posed the question:

  • Explain how you will remember the steps to converting a mixed number into an improper fraction.

Assignment

We worked about half of today's Fifth Grade Builder #9 together. There were pieces of information that were review, but needed revisiting. The vocabulary was all new, so we completed that together to ensure that students had the correct definitions to the correct word.


Sunday, September 17, 2017

Thrively: Discover Your Strengths and Interests

Bell Ringer:  Sugar Packets by Dan Meyer


This activity is presented in "3 Acts".

  • Act 1 - students watch a video and guess the number of packets of sugar they believe are in a 20oz soda.
  • Act 2 - using information about grams of sugar in a packet and grams of sugar in a soda, students determine the number of packets of sugar in a soda.
  • Act 3 - watch the video with the answer
Lesson Frame
  • We will learn about our strengths and passions using a Strength Assessment on www.thrively.com
  • I will discover my strengths and my interests as a 5th grader.
Lesson

Students spent the remainder of the class working through the Strengths Assessment on Thrively.  I will be printing every students' strengths for them and their parents to read through, once everyone finishes the assessment.

Close

Once finished with the strengths assessment, students are asked to create their first journal entry:


Thursday, September 14, 2017

Prime, Composite, Prime Factorization: Rotation Day C

Bell Ringer:  Guess My Number



Students are given a series of clues to determine a mystery number.

Lesson Frame:

  • We will work on activities that reinforce our understanding prime numbers, composite numbers, and prime factorization.
  • I will analyze a number using divisibility rules to determine if it is prime or composite.
Lesson:


Group 1 spent their first rotation in Content Mastery working on intervention activities. Their second rotation was with me. We did the "cootie catcher" prime, composite, and prime factorization activity.

Group 2 & 3 each completed an activity called "P.C.'s Ideal Job" from The Mailbox Magazine, the rest of the time was spend on Think Through Math.

Group 4 worked with me and the "cootie catchers" and then time on Think Through Math.

Assignment:


I wanted some feedback on how students are doing with prime, composite, and prime factorization, so I created a form with questions for them to solve. I used "Identify Prime and Composite Numbers" from TPT for most of the questions, but supplemented a few of my own questions requiring students to use a factor tree to determine the prime factorization.

Close

I actually included the close within the assignment. I gave my students the number 48 and asked them to determine which divisibility rules worked and if 48 was prime or composite.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Prime, Composite, Prime Factorization: Rotation Day B

Bell Ringer:  http://www.101qs.com/ 


Screenshot 2016-09-13 at 7.02.37 PM.png

Students really liked this one!  We even took a moment to Google the actual cost.... you can purchase this at WalMart for $49.95!

Lesson Frame:
  • We will work on activities that reinforce our understanding prime numbers, composite numbers, and prime factorization.
  • I will analyze a number using divisibility rules to determine if it is prime or composite.
Lesson:

I made another change today... not only do I have four regular groups, I also have a Number Sense group that I would like to work with, so I maneuvered my groups just a little today.

Groups 1 & 4 spent 30 minutes focused on Khan Academy today, working with prime numbers. This covered their two 15 minute rotations.

I combined groups 2 & 3 but removed students who are interested in working on Number Sense. This group worked with me first on the "I Have, Who Has" from yesterday and then worked on the prime and composite lessons on Khan.
My Number Sense group went to www.mathninja.org to watch the video on Divisibility Rules and then to begin working on problems involving divisibility. Their second rotation was with me playing the "I Have, Who Has".

This new setup worked well!

Close
Analyze the number 51 using divisibility rules to
determine if it is prime or composite.

I asked students to work with me on this one. They turned to the divisibility rules that are posted in their journal and we walked through each rule to determine divisibility. We only found 3 to be a factor of 51. We used this to determine that 51 is composite as it has more than 3 factors.

Assignment

To finish up, we did a Fifth Grade Builder and any extra time was spent on Khan.


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Prime, Composite, Prime Factorization: Rotation Day A

Bell Ringer:  Which One Doesn't Belong

Screenshot 2016-09-12 at 5.56.35 PM.png

Lesson Frame:
  • We will work on activities that reinforce our understanding prime numbers, composite numbers, and prime factorization.
  • I will predict whether the  number 9  is prime or composite using my understanding of divisibility rules.
Lesson

So, as with anything, there is a little trial and error to be had. After completing our TTM Placement Test and MStar Universal Screener, I now have a better idea of who needs intervention. I thought I would try something different this year. Instead of asking students to give up PE and/or recess time, I looked for ways to do intervention within my class time.

I decided that my Group 1 would be my "intervention" group, and that they could use the first 20 minutes of class and the first 15 minute rotation, twice a week, to meet this need. So, in each class group one went to Content Mastery to work on intervention activities with the teacher. Their second rotation would be to work with me in a small group on our current concept. I chose to create an "I Have, Who Has" wrap around game using prime numbers, composite numbers, and prime factorization.


Groups 2 and 3 both spent one rotation on Think Through Math and their other rotation playing with "Cootie Catchers" to practice prime, composite, and prime factorization.  This activity was the same as last week, just new concepts.


Group 4 spent one rotation on Think Through Math and the second rotation doing the "I Have, Who Has" with me.

Close

Predict whether the  number 9  is prime or composite using your understanding of divisibility rules.

Assignment

We finished off the day with a Fifth Grade Builder and Think Through Math.


Monday, September 11, 2017

Divisibility Rules and Prime Factorization

Bell Ringer:

Today we visited SET and tried our hand at finding the six sets:


Lesson Frame:

  • We will take notes about divisibility rules and prime factorization.
  • I will diagram finding the prime factors of 18.
Lesson


We began our lesson by adding the divisibility rules to our math journal.  I demonstrated using the divisibility rules by finding all of the factors of 12.

Next, we created a page in our journal where we could work on prime factorization.  I explained that prime factorization is just finding the prime numbers that are multiplied together to make the original number.  Next, I had them write down the first 6 prime numbers, which are invaluable to know:

2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13

Then, we revisited the divisibility rules to find ALL factors of 48.  We did this because I wanted to demonstrate that you can use any set of factors of a number on a factor tree and your prime factorization will always come out the same.

I had someone determine which set we would begin with.  I explained that we never include the "1 x ___", because 1 is not a prime number.  When we finished we had discovered that the prime factorization of 48 is 2x2x2x2x3.  A second student chose another set, yet the prime factorization was still the same.  Finally a third student chose a third set, again, this set had the exact same factors!  Point made!

Close

To demonstrate understanding, I asked the students to diagram the prime factors of 18 using a factor tree.

Assignment

We finished our day, by completing a Fifth Grade Builder and working on Think Through Math.

Friday, September 8, 2017

MStar Universal Screener

Today, my students were asked to complete the MStar Universal Screener.

Overview (from https://www.texasgateway.org/resource/estarmstar )

The Elementary School Students in Texas: Algebra Ready (ESTAR) and Middle-School Students in Texas: Algebra Ready (MSTAR) Universal Screeners (US) are an online formative assessment system administered to students in grades 2–4 (ESTAR) and grades 5–8 (MSTAR).
The purpose of the ESTAR/MSTAR US are to help guide instructional decisions in relation to students’ readiness for algebra. The results, which are reported using the Response to Intervention tiers, can be used to help teachers determine if students are on track or at risk for meeting curricular expectations in algebra and for algebra readiness. Results also help teachers determine the intensity of the instructional support students need if they have been identified as at risk for not meeting curricular expectations in algebra and for algebra readiness. Teachers are able to monitor students’ risk status by administering comparable forms of the ESTAR/MSTAR US in fall, winter, and early spring.
The ESTAR/MSTAR Diagnostic Assessments (DA) are administered only to students identified through the ESTAR/MSTAR US as struggling with algebra-readiness knowledge and skills. The DA are used to identity why students are struggling with algebra-related core instruction and to provide information that can be used to plan supplemental instruction.
The ESTAR/MSTAR US and DA can be accessed at https://www.estarmstar.org/login.
Districts that would like to administer the ESTAR/MSTAR Universal Screener and Diagnostic Assessments must create unique district administrator accounts as well as teacher and student accounts.  For questions about accounts and general assistance related to the ESTAR/MSTAR Universal Screener or Diagnostic Assessments, please contact mathtx@esc13.net.
Getting Started
Download the Universal Screener FAQ

This assessment is another piece of data I use as I make educational decisions about how and what to teach.





Once students have completed the Universal Screener, there are Diagnostic Assessments available to help teachers determine where gaps are.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Factors and Multiples: Rotation Day C

Screenshot 2017-08-30 at 7.43.13 PM.png

Bell Ringer

Screenshot 2017-09-06 at 5.22.48 PM.png

Today, we used the website 101 questions to create math questions about pictures found in real life!  The kids did a much better job this week!  They were much more comfortable with the idea of writing math related questions.

Lesson Frame
  • We will work on activities that focus on factors and multiples.
  • I will compare and contrast factors and multiples of a number.
Lesson

Factors and Multiples Bump     Factors and Multiples Cootie Catchers
  • Group 1
  • Group 2
    • Think Through Math
    • BUMP: Factors and Multiples
  • Group 3
    • BUMP: Factors and Multiples
    • Think Through Math
  • Group 4
Factors and Multiples Task Cards

We finished up with a Factors and Multiples quiz (using Factors and Multiples Task Cards) that I created on a Google Form. If you didn't know..... you can know create an answer key ON the Google Form and assign it as a quiz! So easy, so much better that having to take extra steps!!

Close

Compare and contrast factors and multiples.  Tell one way in which they are alike and one way in which they are different.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Multiples and Factors: Rotation Day B

Screenshot 2017-08-30 at 7.43.13 PM.png

Bell Ringer:  Which One Doesn't Belong
Screenshot 2016-09-05 at 2.20.44 PM.png
I love this activity!  Students are asked to look at the numbers and decide which one doesn't belong and explain.  A few of the answers today:
  • 9, it's the only single digit number
  • 16, it's the only even number
  • 43, it's the only prime number
  • 9, it's the only one whose digits do not create a sum of 7
  • 43, the other numbers can be made my double factors (3x3, 4x4, 5x5)
  • 25, it's the only one whose one's digit is not a multiple of 3
Lesson Frame:
  • We will work on activities that focus on factors and multiples of numbers.
  • I will describe which I like better, finding factors or finding multiples of a number and support my choice.
Lesson:
  • Group 1
    • Khan Academy - Assignments on Factors
    • Think Through Math
  • Group 2
    • Think Through Math
    • Teacher Table - visited about UIL Number Sense and worked with Roman Numerals
  • Group 3
    • Teacher Table - visited about UIL Number Sense and worked with Roman Numerals
    • Think Through Math
  • Group 4
    • Think Through Math
    • Khan Academy - Assignments on Factors
The UIL Number Sense group will be a part of my rotations once a week. During that time, students will take Number Sense tests. Learning new shortcuts and strategies will have to happen on their own time. To help with this, I am using:


This book works in conjunction with a set of videos found at MathNinja.org.  I intend for my students to be self motivated self learners and this is an excellent way to begin!

Close:

Describe which you like better, finding factors or finding multiples of a number and support your choice.



Fifth Grade Builder #4

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Multiples and Factors: Rotation Day A

Screenshot 2017-08-30 at 7.43.13 PM.png

Bell Ringer

Today's bell ringer is the online version of SET.  If you are new to the game, a the rules can be found online.  Once the kids get the hang of it, they really enjoy the challenge!

Image result for SET

Lesson Frame
  • We will work with factors and multiples of numbers.
  • I will explain how to find the factors of 48.
Lesson

I will explain today's class by showing the two rotations my classes worked through:

Factors and Multiples Bump     Factors and Multiples Cootie Catchers

  • Group 1 
    • Teacher table playing the game BUMP using factors and multiples.
    • Think Through Math
  • Group 2
  • Group 3
  • Group 4
    • Think Through Math
    • Teacher table playing the game BUMP using factors and multiples.
The kids really seemed to enjoy the activities!  They gave me quite some insight into confusion about factors and multiples!

Close

Today I just modeled what I would like a page to look like when I ask them to:

Explain how you would find all of the factors of 48.

Assignment

We spent the last 20-25 minutes of each class completing our Fifth Grade Builder #3.

Friday, September 1, 2017

Multiples/Factors and Prime/Composite


Bell Ringer

Today's bell ringer was a "Would You Rather"


I ask students to work as a table group to make their decision, however, it must be supported by mathematics.

Lesson Frame
  • We will take notes about factors, multiples, prime and composite, to use during our rotations next week.
  • I will explain the importance of factors when working with prime/composite numbers.
Lesson

We began our lesson discussing FACTORS.  We defined factors as "the two numbers multiplied together to get a product".  (Factor x Factor = Multiple)  Then we found the factors of 24 using a multiplication table.  Finally, we listed all of the factors in order from least to greatest and formed our "rainbow".



Next we moved into multiples.  We defined this as the answer to a multiplication problem, or a product.  I mentioned that an easy way to remember what a multiple is would be to use skip counting.... there are many multiples.



Finally we worked our way through finding prime an composite numbers.  We began by defining a prime number as having only 2 factors.  Composite numbers have more than two factors.  To filter out the composite numbers, we worked through the "Sieve of Eratosthenes" to filtering out multiples.  The final result:


Once we finished the notes, students got onto Khan Academy and began watching videos and doing lessons on Factors.

Close

Explain the importance of factors to determining if a number is prime or composite.



Thursday, August 31, 2017

Note Taking

Bell Ringer

Today's bell ringer was a "Guess My Number!" challenge.  Students could work together as a table group to determine the answer using mathematical clues.  I had a few successful students, but as this was our first attempt, I was just happy that they willfully attempted the challenge!

Lesson Frame

  • We will learn how our math class will look as we work in small groups rotating through working with Mrs. Dittrich, working independently on TTM, and working in a small group on math activities chosen specifically for our group.
  • I will summarize the relationship between the Social Contract, Secret to Success,  and mindsets as we work through rotations.

Lesson

We only spent a few minutes discussing a rotation schedule. It is very abstract to discuss something that will happen in the future. However, we talked about what it will look like and I showed them a sample of our schedule:

Screenshot 2017-08-30 at 7.43.13 PM.png

Next we spent time adding some notes to our math journal using the assignment "Fifth Grade Builder's 1".  
  • First we cut off the bottom section titled "Vocabulary" and taped it to the back of the front cover for easy access.  This will give them a reference for the next time these same words appear.  
  • Next, we created a GEMDAS (order of operations) page.  Order of Operations will show up on every FGB for a while, so it was important to take time to explain it effectively.
  • Finally, we created a Coordinate Graphing page.  We cut out and glued down the color coded example we made yesterday.  Again, this is for reference as they will be asked to label  these types of graphs again.
Next, we moved to today assignment, Fifth Grade Builder #2.  A new set of vocabulary words meant that we spent time defining them correctly.  Tomorrow we will add this to our journal.

The remainder of class time was given to completing FGB2.  Students were more successful with the long division, but I am still catching errors when it comes to subtracting across zeros.

Close

To wrap up, I asked my classes to summarize the relationship between our Social Contract, Secret to Success, and growth mindset as it connects to our using rotation stations.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Khan Academy/Fifth Grade Builder

Bell Ringer:


Today's bell ringer comes from 101 Questions.  I use this site once a week as a warm up activity.  I post a picture on the screen and ask my students to write the first MATH question that comes to mind.  I use Google Classroom for students to submit their questions.  This allows me to showcase everyone's questions, but also help my students to correct their work and get ideas from other students.

Since this was our first attempt, many of my students questions were pretty basic, however, I had a few that exceeded my expectations.  My favorite actually wrote me a word problem:


A man ordered fries, lemons, and pickles at a restaurant.  The fries were $3.50, the pickles were a dollar, and the lemons were 50 cents.  How much money did he make in all?

Good Things

As usual, I spent about 5 minutes allowing students to share the "good things" that are happening to them.  I do this with every class to ensure that I get to learn about my students.  One of the best parts of my day!

Lesson Frame
  • We will learn about our use of Khan Academy this year including earning rewards as we work and how to use Khan Academy as a resource when working through TTM.
  • I will explain how purposefully using Khan Academy can help me while I work on Think Through Math.
Lesson

We began the lesson by ensuring that the students all had a working bookmark to Khan. Then I had them join my Khan classroom. Khan has made changes over the summer, so we had to work through some of the setup together. Once that was taken care of, we discussed the ways that we could use Khan to enhance our learning with Think Through Math and walked through the rewards available as students earn Khan skills:


Before allowing students some time to explore and work with Khan, it was time to begin working on our first math assignment.  I had heard about a book series called "Algebra Readiness Builders," that was able to close some of the gaps that hinder students ability to understand algebra.  I decided to use the first "builder" today.  I actually broke the page in 1/2.  The top half was complete review, but the bottom half was introducing some new concepts.   I chose to work the problems on the bottom half with my students so that I could model for them.


I do not like to assign math for homework, so I set apart at least 20 minutes a day to work on that day's assignment.  I also like to give my students immediate feedback, as well as being able to see immediately what concepts are causing problems.  To do this, I require students to solve a single problem at a time and bring their paper to me to check.  If it is correct, they get a check mark.  If it is incorrect, I circle the problem number and either give guidance as to where the error occurred or ask the students to look more closely at their work.  This process also ensures that students either completely finish their work in class, or have only a few problems to complete at home.

I must say, while these problems were intended to be review, I certainly found some areas that I need to work on with my kids!

Once students had finished the assignment, they were able to get onto Khan for a few minutes.

Close

To close the lesson, I had students talk with their table group.  They needed to explain how purposefully using Khan Academy can help them while working on Think Through Math.

After a few minutes of discussion, one student from each group needed to report their decision to the class. All of the groups concurred. If someone is stuck on a topic in TTM, they can open a new tab to Khan, search the topic, watch the video, and solve the problems to help gain an understanding!